Mirrors

Imagine life without a mirror. Or selfie mode. Or a webcam. Etc.

While we might go about our day just fine, we would feel uneasy, having no insight into our appearance. Mirrors give us information about ourselves that we cannot see on our own.

To get more insight, we would have to rely on those around us, asking a spouse, family member, or roommate for their perspective. Hoping to remove as much subjectivity as possible, we would ask pointed questions and provide clear context.

"Is my hair sticking up? I have a cowlick that is so hard to control."

"Does my face look red? Sometimes my face lotion irritates my skin."

"Should I iron this shirt or think I can get away with the wrinkles on Zoom?"

There is no mirror for our interactions at home, at work, and in life. Short of hiring a 24/7 camera crew, we cannot simply look at a mirror and get insight into whether or not we were a good listener when our friend was going through a tough time or if we sounded confident in our team presentation.

Without a mirror, we need feedback.

If we are lucky, we will receive feedback openly from our peers, family, and friends. However, we often have to seek it out.

Like life without a mirror, it is up to us to ask questions. To uncover the perspective that is impossible for us to get on our own.

Sure, we can live without a mirror. And we can live without feedback. But how can we ever expect to be better without seeing the full picture?